personal reflections for people on a journey

GoingOK collects personal autobiographic reflections from people who are undertaking change or transition. The web application allows users to indicate how they feel they are going, and write about why they feel that way. These short reflections are collected regularly over a period of time.



Guides:

GoingOk Users's Guide

GoingOk Facilitator's Guide

Source code:

GoingOk source code is available on Github

Contributors:

Andrew Gibson
Mike Powell

Current GoingOk projects:

Preparing Assessment Capable Teachers

Queens University, Canada.
King's College London, United Kingdom.
University of Waikato, New Zealand.
Queensland University of Technology (QUT), Australia


Prior Research:

Looking for leadership

Willis, Jill, Crosswell, Leanne, Morrison, Chad, Gibson, Andrew, & Ryan, Mary (2017) Looking for leadership: The potential of dialogic reflexivity with rural early career teachers. Teachers and Teaching: Theory and Practice.

Looking for leadership: The potential of dialogic reflexivity with rural early career teachers

Many early career teachers (ECTs) begin their teaching careers in rural and remote schools in Australia, and do not stay long, with consequences for their own lives, and for their students, schools and communities. By understanding how first year ECTs navigate personal (subjective) and contextual (objective) conditions, opportunities to disrupt patterns of ECT attrition may be found. This paper explores the online longitudinal reflections from two rural ECTs. Margaret Archer’s three dimensions of reflexivity were used to analyse what personal, structural and cultural resources were activated by ECTs as they discerned and deliberated the costs of being a rural ECT.


Early career teachers in rural schools

Crosswell, Leanne, Willis, Jill, Morrison, Chad, Gibson, Andrew, & Ryan, Mary E. (2018) Early career teachers in rural schools: Plotlines of resilience. In Wosnitza, M., Peixoto, F., Beltman, S., & Mansfield, C. (Eds.) Resilience in Education: Concepts, Contexts and Connections. Springer, pp. 131-146.

Early career teachers in rural schools: Plotlines of resilience.

This chapter explores the plotlines of resilience as narrated by three early career teachers (ECTs) in rural schools and the deliberation process they undertook in response to their key challenges. Regular online reflections about their transition into rural teaching were collected through www.goingok.org, a digital tool (see Gibson A, Willis J, Morrison C, Crosswell L, Not losing the plot: creating, collecting and curating qualitative data through a web-based application. In The Australian Teacher Education Association (ATEA) 2013 Conference, July 2013, Queensland University of Technology, Brisbane, QLD. (Unpublished), 2013). Drawing on a transactional-ecological theory of resilience, the qualitative analysis was informed by current literature (see Day C, Gu Q, Resilient teachers, resilient schools: Building and sustaining quality in testing times. Routledge, Oxon, 2014; Mansfield CF, Beltman S, Broadley T, Weatherby-Fell N. Teach Teach Educ 54:77–87. https://doi.org/10.1016/j.tate.2015.11.016, 2016) that highlights the dynamic and ongoing process of interaction between the contextual and personal factors. The analysis was also informed by Archer’s (2000) theories of social realism that enables the interplay between the personal powers of humans to act (PEPs), the affordances and constraints of the structural-material (SEPs) and cultural-discursive systems (CEPs)


Towards the discovery of learner metacognition from reflective writing

Gibson, Andrew, Kitto, Kirsty, & Bruza, Peter (2016) Towards the discovery of learner metacognition from reflective writing. Journal of Learning Analytics, 3(2), pp. 22-36.

Towards the discovery of learner metacognition from reflective writing

Modern society demands renewed attention on the competencies required to best equip students for a dynamic and uncertain future. We present exploratory work based on the premise that metacognitive and reflective competencies are essential for this task. Bringing the concepts of metacognition and reflection together into a conceptual model within which we conceived of them as both a set of similar features, and as a spectrum ranging from the unconscious inner-self through to the conscious external social self. This model was used to guide exploratory computational analysis of 6090 instances of reflective writing authored by undergraduate students. We found the conceptual model to be useful in informing the computational analysis, which in turn showed potential for automating the discovery of metacognitive activity in reflective writing, an approach that holds promise for the generation of formative feedback for students as they work towards developing core 21st century competencies.


Turning points in narratives of research design

Morrison, Chad, Willis, Jill, Crosswell, Leanne, & Gibson, Andrew (2014) Turning points in narratives of research design : research innovation stimulating unique responses to existing challenges for beginning rural teachers. The Journal of Educational Enquiry, 13(1), pp. 3-17.

Turning points in narratives of research design : research innovation stimulating unique responses to existing challenges for beginning rural teachers

This paper explores methodological turning points in researching narratives of early career resilience mediated by the complexities of remote teaching. Innovative, flexible and discursive research design facilitated exploration of emerging narratives using digital technologies. Data were regularly interrogated with participant-researchers to reveal the undercurrents of imbued meaning. Dialogue with participant-researchers enhanced interpretations of data plots and text-based explanations of narrative turning points, providing valuable insights throughout analysis. Reflections on the affordances and tensions in this process illustrate the significance of innovation but also the complexities associated with online collaboration. Consequently, empowering the participant-researchers throughout the life of the research was critical in understanding their narratives of teaching.